TOURISM THINK TANK

Traveling makes a man wiser, but less happy.
Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826) Third president of the United States.


The whole object of travel is not to set foot on foreign land; it is at last to set foot on one's own country as a foreign land.
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936) British journalist, novelist and poet.

The fool wanders, a wise man travels.
Thomas Fuller (1608-1661) British clergyman and author

The important thing about travel in foreign lands is that it breaks the speech habits and makes you blab less, and breaks the habitual space-feeling because of different village plans and different landscapes. It is less important that there are different mores, for you counteract these with your own reaction-formations.
Paul Goodman (1911-1972) American author, poet and critic.

I would like to spend my whole life traveling, if I could borrow another life to spend at home.
William Hazlitt (1778-1830) British essayist.

They change their climate, not their soul, who rush across the sea.
Horace (BC 65-8) Latin lyric poet.

Your true traveler finds boredom rather agreeable than painful. It is the symbol of his liberty -- his excessive freedom. He accepts his boredom, when it comes, not merely philosophically, but almost with pleasure.
Aldous Huxley (1894-1963) British author.

Though there are some disagreeable things in Venice there is nothing so disagreeable as the visitors.
Henry James (1843-1916) American author.

Like all great travelers, I have seen more than I remember and remember more than I have seen.
Benjamin Disraeli (1804-1881) British politician and author.

Our instructed vagrancy, which has hardly time to linger by the hedgerows, but runs away early to the tropics, and is at home with palms and banyans --which is nourished on books of travel, and stretches the theatre of its imagination to the Zambesi.
George Eliot (1819-1880) British writer.

I am not much an advocate for traveling, and I observe that men run away to other countries because they are not good in their own, and run back to their own because they pass for nothing in the new places. For the most part, only the light characters travel. Who are you that have no task to keep you at home?
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) U.S. poet, essayist and lecturer.

It would be nice to travel if you knew where you were going and where you would live at the end or do we ever know, do we ever live where we live, we're always in other places, lost, like sheep.
Janet Frame (1924-2004) New Zealand writer.

For the perfect idler, for the passionate observer it becomes an immense source of enjoyment to establish his dwelling in the throng, in the ebb and flow, the bustle, the fleeting and the infinite. To be away from home and yet to feel at home anywhere; to see the world, to be at the very center of the world, and yet to be unseen of the world, such are some of the minor pleasures of those independent, intense and impartial spirits, who do not lend themselves easily to linguistic definitions. The observer is a prince enjoying his incognito wherever he goes.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867) French poet.

I swims in the Tagus all across at once, and I rides on an ass or a mule, and swears Portuguese, and have got a diarrhea and bites from the mosquitoes. But what of that? Comfort must not be expected by folks that go a pleasuring.
Lord Byron (1788-1824) British poet.

I am so convinced of the advantages of looking at mankind instead of reading about them, and of the bitter effects of staying at home with all the narrow prejudices of an Islander, that I think there should be a law amongst us to set our young men abroad for a term among the few allies our wars have left us.
Lord Byron (1788-1824) British poet.

The traveler sees what he sees, the tourist see what he has come to see.
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936) British journalist, novelist and poet.

Worth seeing? Yes; but not worth going to see.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784) British author.

As the Spanish proverb says, ''He who would bring home the wealth of the Indies, must carry the wealth of the Indies with him.'' So it is in travelling; a man must carry knowledge with him, if he would bring home knowledge.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784) British author.

In traveling, a man must carry knowledge with him, if he would bring home knowledge.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784) British author.

The use of traveling is to regulate imagination by reality, and instead of thinking how things may be, to see them as they are.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784) British author.



Traveling makes a man wiser, but less happy.
Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826) Third president of the United States.


The whole object of travel is not to set foot on foreign land; it is at last to set foot on one's own country as a foreign land.
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936) British journalist, novelist and poet.

The fool wanders, a wise man travels.
Thomas Fuller (1608-1661) British clergyman and author

The important thing about travel in foreign lands is that it breaks the speech habits and makes you blab less, and breaks the habitual space-feeling because of different village plans and different landscapes. It is less important that there are different mores, for you counteract these with your own reaction-formations.
Paul Goodman (1911-1972) American author, poet and critic.

I would like to spend my whole life traveling, if I could borrow another life to spend at home.
William Hazlitt (1778-1830) British essayist.

They change their climate, not their soul, who rush across the sea.
Horace (BC 65-8) Latin lyric poet.

Your true traveler finds boredom rather agreeable than painful. It is the symbol of his liberty -- his excessive freedom. He accepts his boredom, when it comes, not merely philosophically, but almost with pleasure.
Aldous Huxley (1894-1963) British author.

Though there are some disagreeable things in Venice there is nothing so disagreeable as the visitors.
Henry James (1843-1916) American author.

Like all great travelers, I have seen more than I remember and remember more than I have seen.
Benjamin Disraeli (1804-1881) British politician and author.

Our instructed vagrancy, which has hardly time to linger by the hedgerows, but runs away early to the tropics, and is at home with palms and banyans --which is nourished on books of travel, and stretches the theatre of its imagination to the Zambesi.
George Eliot (1819-1880) British writer.

I am not much an advocate for traveling, and I observe that men run away to other countries because they are not good in their own, and run back to their own because they pass for nothing in the new places. For the most part, only the light characters travel. Who are you that have no task to keep you at home?
Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) U.S. poet, essayist and lecturer.

It would be nice to travel if you knew where you were going and where you would live at the end or do we ever know, do we ever live where we live, we're always in other places, lost, like sheep.
Janet Frame (1924-2004) New Zealand writer.

For the perfect idler, for the passionate observer it becomes an immense source of enjoyment to establish his dwelling in the throng, in the ebb and flow, the bustle, the fleeting and the infinite. To be away from home and yet to feel at home anywhere; to see the world, to be at the very center of the world, and yet to be unseen of the world, such are some of the minor pleasures of those independent, intense and impartial spirits, who do not lend themselves easily to linguistic definitions. The observer is a prince enjoying his incognito wherever he goes.
Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867) French poet.

I swims in the Tagus all across at once, and I rides on an ass or a mule, and swears Portuguese, and have got a diarrhea and bites from the mosquitoes. But what of that? Comfort must not be expected by folks that go a pleasuring.
Lord Byron (1788-1824) British poet.

I am so convinced of the advantages of looking at mankind instead of reading about them, and of the bitter effects of staying at home with all the narrow prejudices of an Islander, that I think there should be a law amongst us to set our young men abroad for a term among the few allies our wars have left us.
Lord Byron (1788-1824) British poet.

The traveler sees what he sees, the tourist see what he has come to see.
Gilbert Keith Chesterton (1874-1936) British journalist, novelist and poet.

Worth seeing? Yes; but not worth going to see.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784) British author.

As the Spanish proverb says, ''He who would bring home the wealth of the Indies, must carry the wealth of the Indies with him.'' So it is in travelling; a man must carry knowledge with him, if he would bring home knowledge.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784) British author.

In traveling, a man must carry knowledge with him, if he would bring home knowledge.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784) British author.

The use of traveling is to regulate imagination by reality, and instead of thinking how things may be, to see them as they are.
Samuel Johnson (1709-1784) British author.

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